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Global cuisine

The foodie’s guide to Paris

Aug 24, 2017 by Emily Houston

Paris is a multicultural city serving up far more than the traditional escargot and foie gras dishes you’d expect to find in France’s capital. Culinary experts from across the world have moved to Paris, bringing with them the flavors from their home countries. We reveal what to eat in Paris, where to find it, and the city’s most unique restaurants and bars that make far-off destinations feel local.

Drink from Candelaria.

Candelaria

Visit at: 52 Rue de Saintonge, 3rd arrondissement

Step inside Candelaria to see a small taco restaurant and a white door flush against the back wall. Press on the door and you’ll be welcomed into a 21st-century speakeasy. Candelaria has a rustic vibe and feels exclusive, yet fresh and modern. A Latin thread carries throughout, from the decor to the menu design to the drinks, each of which is inspired by a Latin American folktale. Flick the spinner on the front cover of the menu if you don’t know what to order or go with our pick, El Sombrero.

Boot Café

Visit at: 19 Rue du Pont aux Choux, 6th arrondissement

Real Parisian culture can be found in the tiny cafes that serve espressos and cappuccinos to locals looking for a cup of coffee on the go. Brewing with authenticity, Boot Café has kept the original light blue sign that reads _cordonnerie,_meaningshoe repair store, above the entrance. Rather than paying to sit at one of the few tables, quickly drink your coffee at the bar before moving on to your next adventure.

Pizza from Chez Gusto.

Chez Gusto

Visit at: 93 Rue de La Jonquière, 17th arrondissement

Chez Gusto is an Italian restaurant offering up 19 types of brick oven pizza on three different kinds of crust. Order your pizza on thin, regular, or dark crust, which turns black as it’s mixed with charcoal. Each pizza features a well-rounded amount of ingredients that creates a cohesive flavor without feeling overwhelming. Sample the tricolor pizza that includes mozzarella, pesto, arugula, and cherry tomatoes.

Little Red Door

Visit at: 60 Rue Charlot, 3rd arrondissement

Walk through a little red door and take a seat inside this classic cocktail bar, complete with exposed brick walls and candlelit tables. One of the most unique aspects of this bar is its deep-rooted connection to art. Painters, drawers, and tattoo artists from across the world were hired to sample one of the drinks and draw how it tasted. These drawings are how the drinks are represented in the menu and how customers can select what they want to order. We recommend drinks no. 1 and no. 7.

Pickled eggs form Buvette.

Buvette

Visit at: 28 Rue Henry Monnier, 9th arrondissement

Head to Buvette to enjoy brunch at an ultra-trendy spot. Cozy and quaint, the restaurant’s specialties are its egg and seafood dishes. Our selection is the pickled eggs. The skin turns a hue of soft pink during the pickling process and is topped with vegetables and spices. If you’re looking to curb your seafood craving, order the oysters which are shucked tableside.

Oysters from Buvette.

Looking for more traditional French foods? Here’s your guide of where to go to enjoy Parisian specialties like a local.

Crêpes Whether you’re down by the Eiffel Tower or up by the Sacré-Cœur, street cart vendors are the way to go.

Croissants & baguettes Boulangeries, or bread shops, are open in the early morning so you’ll be served a warm, fresh loaf of bread any time of day.

Croque Monsieur Visit a brasserie, an informal restaurant, for the French version of a ham-and-cheese sandwich—perfect with a regional beer or wine.

Macarons Skip Ladurée and head to Pierre Hermé. While on the more expensive side, Chef Pierre is known as the “Picasso of pastries.”

What’s the most memorable meal you’ve had on a visit to Paris? Let us know on Facebook!


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About the author | Emily Houston
Emily loves the simple travel moments—like watching hours pass by in minutes while sharing a meal, a carafe of sangria, and a laugh (or many) with her friends and family. Outside the office, you'll find Emily listening to anything and everything John Mayer, attempting to cook a New York Times recipe, or dreaming up her next trip.

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